• Complete And Partial Dentures

    • Read through Extraction Instructions for care of your extraction sites.
     
    • For the first day after surgery, keep your head in an upright position as much as possible, take your medication, and rest. Keep a slight pressure on your denture for the first 4 hours after surgery. There may be some oozing of blood and the dentures will provide pressure to control bleeding and swelling.
     
    • Eat soft, healthy foods such as eggs, soups, mashed potatoes, or cottage cheese. Drink cool liquids. Be careful with hot foods. The plastic part of your denture may make it difficult to tell how hot your food is. take care to avoid burns.
     
    • Usually, Dr. Cooney will see you in 24-48 hours after surgery to check your healing and make any necessary adjustments. If you have any immediate concerns before your post-op check appointment, please call the office.
     
    • For the first few days after surgery, remove your dentures 3-4 times per day and gently rinse your mouth with warm salt water (1tsp salt disolved in 12 oz warm water). The dentures should be lightly brushed at the same time, then replaced in your mouth.
     
    • The shape of your mouth will change quickly for at least one month after the teeth have been extracted. Changes can continue for up to 5 months. During this time, the dentures can become loose and adjustments and temporary relines will be needed. Be prepared to visit the office regularly while you are adjusting to your new dentures.
     
    • Dentures, like natural teeth, must be kept clean in order to maintain the health of your mouth and keep them odor-free. Thoroughly brush all surfaces of the dentures, inside and out, morning and night. A soaking type cleaner may be used in addition to good brushing. You may brush with the solution from the soaking cleaners, liquid soaps, or special toothpaste designed for dentures. Never use scouring powders on your dentures. They will disolve the denture materials or roughen the surface. If your dentures are going to be left out of your mouth for a long period of time, place them in water.
     
    • Getting used to your dentures will take some time and patience. They may feel loose while the muscles of your cheeks and tongue learn to hold them in place. Saliva may increase. Minor irritation or soreness is not unusual. In addition, you may find that you bite your cheeks or tongue when you are larning to use your new dentures.
     
    • Eating with new dentures takes practice and patience. Start with soft foods cut into small portions. Chewing slowly and using both sides of your mouth at the same time will keep the dentures from moving out of place. Other types of foods can be added gradually until you are able to resume your normal diet.
     
    • Speaking with new dentures takes practice and patience as well. Read out loud and repeat hard words in front of the mirror. Speak slowly to reduce muffled, blurred, or thickened speech. You may even lisp or whistle your "s" when you first try to talk. In addition, your dentures may sometimes slip out of place when you laugh, cough, or smile. You can reposition them by gently biting down and swallowing. These problems will correct themselves over a period of time.
     
    • A lower denture will never be "tight" like an upper denture. the lower denture does not have the "suction" to keep it in place like the upper one does. The lower denture is held in place by the muscles of the lips, tongue, and cheeks. It should not "pop" out of place, but it does not have a tight feeling. A complete lower denture usually takes 4-5 times longer to master as compared to the upper denture.